The retrospective analysis examines the role of political stakeholders, vested institutional and individual values in the policy development process. The President's ultimate decisions, on both policies and policy title, were guided by complex conflicts and compromises, negotiations and trade-offs, and finally, by his technical as well as his political concerns. Carter's policy planning mechanism often was paralyzed by a number of power struggles over: • Health Education and Welfare's (now Health and Human Services) welfare reform • HUD's assisted housing and community development programs • The Department of Commerce's planned economic development expansion • The Department of Labor’s push to preserve expensive concentrated employment initiatives • The Department of Treasury's Urban Bank • A President’s political demand for the urban policy to concentrate on both large and small cities Issues of urban poverty, unemployment, and disinvestment contended with, and were neutralized by, managed growth concerns and Sunbelt needs. Yet, in retrospect, it seems like it was a " walk in the park," even with that fractions group of basically humane sojourners.
Based on the experiences of author Dr. Yvonne Scruggs-Leftwich, who was the Executive Director of the first National Urban Policy process and historical archives, this book analyzes the actions of President Carter, Housing and Urban Development Secretary Patricia Roberts Harris, other Cabinet members, and the professionals leading the process. Consensus and Compromise outlines the negotiation of power, principles, and priorities necessary to ensure the successful creation of the first National Urban Policy. This book is essential for teaching and understanding the history and challenges of providing housing for underserved communities the challenges of implementing public policy. The Exercise in Conflict and Compromise When President Carter and his HUD Secretary, the late Patricia Roberts Harris, undertook the development of a national urban policy in the early months of the administration, conditions in cities were deplorable, as this book documents. The national context, however, was essentially egalitarian, the commitment to an aggressive tide to lift all boats was strong, and the will to fulfill America's promise of improving life for all urban dwellers was determined. The policy process uses this proactive climate to good advantage. This study of the year-long path to a codified national urban policy analyzes the actions, processes, and incremental decisions that finally led to its creation rather than the substance of the policy itself. The focus is upon the dynamics of transactions among federal bureaucrats, public officials, private citizens, urban advocates, and scholars that characterized the policy’s development. Records document how these transactions ultimately led to the ten urban policy components – a series of amended choices – that President Carter announced in March 1978.
ISBN-13: 978-0761833550 ISBN-10: 0761833552
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Based on the experiences of author Dr. Yvonne Scruggs- Leftwich, who was the Executive Director of the first National Urban Policy process and historical archives, this book analyzes the actions of President Carter, Housing and Urban Development Secretary Patricia Roberts Harris, other Cabinet members, and the professionals leading the process. Consensus and Compromise outlines the negotiation of power, principles, and priorities necessary to ensure the successful creation of the first National Urban Policy. This book is essential for teaching and understanding the history and challenges of providing housing for underserved communities the challenges of implementing public policy.
ISBN-13: 978-0761833550 ISBN-10: 0761833552
Use Amazon to Order Use Amazon to Order
The Exercise in Conflict and Compromise When President Carter and his HUD Secretary, the late Patricia Roberts Harris, undertook the development of a national urban policy in the early months of the administration, conditions in cities were deplorable, as this book documents. The national context, however, was essentially egalitarian, the commitment to an aggressive tide to lift all boats was strong, and the will to fulfill America's promise of improving life for all urban dwellers was determined. The policy process uses this proactive climate to good advantage. This study of the year-long path to a codified national urban policy analyzes the actions, processes, and incremental decisions that finally led to its creation rather than the substance of the policy itself. The focus is upon the dynamics of transactions among federal bureaucrats, public officials, private citizens, urban advocates, and scholars that characterized the policy’s development. Records document how these transactions ultimately led to the ten urban policy components a series of amended choices that President Carter announced in March 1978. The retrospective analysis examines the role of political stakeholders, vested institutional and individual values in the policy development process. The President's ultimate decisions, on both policies and policy title, were guided by complex conflicts and compromises, negotiations and trade-offs, and finally, by his technical as well as his political concerns. Carter's policy planning mechanism often was paralyzed by a number of power struggles over: Health Education and Welfare's (now Health and Human Services) welfare reform HUD's assisted housing and community development programs The Department of Commerce's planned economic development expansion The Department of Labor’s push to preserve expensive concentrated employment initiatives The Department of Treasury's Urban Bank A President’s political demand for the urban policy to concentrate on both large and small cities Issues of urban poverty, unemployment, and disinvestment contended with, and were neutralized by, managed growth concerns and Sunbelt needs. Yet, in retrospect, it seems like it was a " walk in the park," even with that fractions group of basically humane sojourners.
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